knowledgeequalsblackpower:

IT HAPPENED AGAIN.. this time i wasnt even mad lmao im used to it.. #Wow #SheThinkImStealingPart2

smh.

(via proletarianinstinct)

onlyblackgirl:

Best collab in history

(via soafrolicious)

journolist:

The Palestinian children killed by Israeli military forces - visualized. 

blackfitandfab:

catsbeaversandducks:

Post-it Notes Left on the Train

Writer and illustrator October Jones, the creative genius behind Text From Dog and these funny train commute doodles, is at it again with these hilarious motivational post-it notes that he leaves on the train and in other random places.The upbeat doodles, which star Jones’ adorable character Peppy the Inspirational Cat, convey positive and funny messages meant to motivate daily commuters. Whether you’re feeling the Monday blues or in need of some encouragement, Jones’ delightful post-it notes are sure to brighten your day and remind you just how awesome you are.

Via My Modern Metropolis 

Peppy the fucking Inspirational Cat you guys!

unapproachableblackchicks:


On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls
JULY 7, 2014BYCIARA MYERS, EDITOR 1 COMMENT
By Riki WilchinsTrueChildhttp://www.truechild.org
Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.
Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.
For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.
Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).
Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.
As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”
Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.
We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.
First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.
Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.
Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.
The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.




Download the report here

unapproachableblackchicks:

On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls


By Riki Wilchins
TrueChild
http://www.truechild.org

Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.


Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.

For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.

Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).

Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.

As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”

Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.

We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.

First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.

Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.

Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.

The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.

Download the report here

polkanots:

trends women should avoid 2014: men’s opinions 

(via magnacarterholygrail)

4chairchicks:

Frank Morrison’s artwork.

(via musingsofanawkwardblackgirl)

dynastylnoire:

hikergirl:

Here is the link to the City Lab article and the link to the actual website, Turn On Detroit’s Water.
h/t to amomenttothink for retweeting this.

boooooooooooooooooost

dynastylnoire:

hikergirl:

Here is the link to the City Lab article and the link to the actual website, Turn On Detroit’s Water.

h/t to amomenttothink for retweeting this.

boooooooooooooooooost

(via theuppitynegras)

REBLOG IF YOU SUPPORT THE DECRIMINALIZATION OF SEX WORK

(via sexworkerproblems)

dynastylnoire:

bitteroreo:

tashabilities:

dynastylnoire:

theblacksideoftown:

englishanthony:

negritaaa:

"diet nigga"
help me jesus

By far the most honest shit on the internet.

black tumblr

ROFLLLL!!!!!
Diet nigga though!

White people saying ‘brother’ and ‘sister’ PERIOD is enough to make me lose it.

I’m sayin’ y’all ain’t my kinfolk, JT pulled that “Sistah’” shit, and y’all see how he left Janet to hang.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
real shit

brownglucose:

weian-fu:

Bob Ross was such a blessing.

This is applicable to everything under the sun. Do what you love. Invest in yourself.

(via dynastylnoire)

bogleech:

gameraboy:

"A Sticky Situation" (1960) by Carl Barks

I like how advertising is literally still exactly as sexist as they’re joking about in this comic from 54 years ago.

(via gettingzen)

sandandglass:

Lisa Simpson, The Simpsons, 1991.

(via sugaredvenom)

My Tumblr blog= lots of reblogs from other journals I enjoy with thoughts and observations from my own life salt-n-peppered in. I encourage you to check out (and follow) the original poster credited and source material.
Expect discussion of white privilege. Expect black feminism. Expect queer pride. Expect recipes, fashion, history, science, and art. This blog is what saves my sanity out here in Southeast Tennessee.

twitter.com/DecafRabbit

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