zakkiwu:

demnaijatinz:

soundofthegenuine:

que-lindaa:

saltysojourn:

Follow this link to find a short clip and analysis that considers intersections of privilege and colonialism.

Can never reblog this enough

Especially the first map…Ethiopia alone is unconquered.

I’ve seen the second image more than any.

“You can talk about Nigeria, people used to laugh at ya/ Now I take a look, I see U.S.A. for Africa?”

(via queergiftedblack)

mgann-morzz:

McDonald’s worker arrested after telling company president she can’t afford shoes.

"A woman who has been employed by the McDonald’s Corporation for over 10 years says she was arrested last week after she confronted the company president at a meeting and told him she couldn’t afford to buy shoes or food for her children.

Nancy Salgado, 26, told The Real News that she felt like she had to speak out during McDonald’s USA President Jeff Stratton’s speech at the Union League Club of Chicago on Friday for the sake of her children.

“It’s really hard for me to feed my two kids and struggle day to day,” she shouted as Stratton was speaking. “Do you think this is fair, that I have to be making $8.25 when I’ve worked for McDonald’s for ten years?”

“I’ve been there for forty years,” Stratton replied from the podium.

“The thing is that I need a raise. But you’re not helping your employees. How is this possible?” Salgado asked.

At that point, someone approached Salgado and informed her that she was going to be arrested.

She later recalled the encounter to The Real News’ Jessica Desvarieux.

“The strength was very powerful, like, just remembering the face of my kids, like I say, you know, just simple things like I can’t provide a pair of shoes like everybody else does, sometimes every month, or anything like that,” she said. “And he needs to know we are what all the employees at McDonald’s are going through. We’re struggling day to day to provide our needs in our houses, things for our kids. And it’s just–it gets harder and harder with just the poverty wage they have us living in.”

“They just told me, you know, well, you’re being under arrest because you just interrupted, you trespassed the property. You’re just going to go to jail,” Salgado added. “And what I remember just telling them, ‘well, like, so, because I have to speak out my mind and I had to tell the president the poverty wage I’m living in, that’s just against the law?’ You know, just be able to speak up your mind and say, you know what, I can’t survive with $8.25? It’s just — it’s ridiculous that I’m going to get arrested. You know.”

Salgado, who is still working at McDonald’s, said she had her hours cut following the arrest and feared further retaliation.

“The CEOs make millions and billions a year and why can’t they provide enough for their employees?” she wondered.”

I think that this is beyond awful for many reasons. People can’t afford to live off of the wages that they are given currently, and can’t even speak out against it. I know tumblr is great for spreading important news like this, so please help me get the word out to support this woman.

(via forgetpolitics)

there is no respect or dignity in being a part of gentrification

thecoalitionmag:

image

mekha writes about the ongoing gentrification in her native home of choppee, south carolina.

I was on the edge of the highway in South Carolina. We were coming out of Choppee, my family’s small town in Georgetown. Choppee is one of those small 2 light towns that used to have a dirt road, no street lights and shuts down at 8pm. You can see people waving to you from your car as you come down the residential plots. Mostly, because we are such a small town that if you are down in Choppee, you probably are kin or fair association. Strolling in the morning in Choppee always brought me so much comfort. Outside, the smell of the charred garbage burned the night before settles in the air. It’s subtly sweet and charred like the inside of a kiln. Sometimes you’ll see elders sitting on their porches resting into their chairs. The lingering low hum of folk hymnals and Gullah work songs was common in my great grandmother’s home. She passed in October and I miss that the most, how you could hear her singing to god before you heard the news or any mundane mayhem from the day. These towns are sacred spaces.

My mother wanted more sweet grass baskets and since we make a trip every year, this was the time to get one. So three generations of Gullah women, went out to go find someone to sell us some baskets. On the edge of the highway was a common stand that you see quite often in South Carolina, Black women selling sweet grass baskets and sitting in lawn chairs waiting for their next patron. It’s a memory or a sort of factual reality in the collection of landmarks that we keep in our hearts as Southern people. We all remember growing up and seeing Black women who look like our aunties on the side of the highway selling fruits, honey or sweet grass baskets or all three.

It was me, my mother and my grandma. For my mother, at least 20 years had passed since she had stood before a sweet grass vendor, looked up and down, scanning the baskets in amazement. My grandma immediately started her small town Gullah greeting. Something I’ve noticed lots of southern Black women do. Right out of the gate they ask you where you are from. What part. “You know Lena Mae?”, “Ah, right back down by King Street. Sho Right”, “How you doing out here? You selling good?” All the while, dropping in some Gullah, holding her arm giving and taking anecdotes about the takeover or the gentrification of the land and privatization of our beaches and marshlands that grow all of the materials we use to make our art.

Read More

saltysojourn:

"Stop Apartheid Now!"Follow this link to find a short audio clip and analysis of Robert F. Kennedy’s famous “Day of Affirmation” speech given at the University of Capetown, South Africa on June 6, 1966.

saltysojourn:

"Stop Apartheid Now!"

Follow this link to find a short audio clip and analysis of Robert F. Kennedy’s famous “Day of Affirmation” speech given at the University of Capetown, South Africa on June 6, 1966.

haleighbaleighbee:

fashioninfographics:

How many times can you wear it between washes?
Via

Huh. I think this is the most important thing I’ve ever reblogged.

haleighbaleighbee:

fashioninfographics:

How many times can you wear it between washes?

Via

Huh. I think this is the most important thing I’ve ever reblogged.

(via howtobeterrell)

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

IT HAPPENED AGAIN.. this time i wasnt even mad lmao im used to it.. #Wow #SheThinkImStealingPart2

smh.

(via proletarianinstinct)

onlyblackgirl:

Best collab in history

(via soafrolicious)

journolist:

The Palestinian children killed by Israeli military forces - visualized. 

blackfitandfab:

catsbeaversandducks:

Post-it Notes Left on the Train

Writer and illustrator October Jones, the creative genius behind Text From Dog and these funny train commute doodles, is at it again with these hilarious motivational post-it notes that he leaves on the train and in other random places.The upbeat doodles, which star Jones’ adorable character Peppy the Inspirational Cat, convey positive and funny messages meant to motivate daily commuters. Whether you’re feeling the Monday blues or in need of some encouragement, Jones’ delightful post-it notes are sure to brighten your day and remind you just how awesome you are.

Via My Modern Metropolis 

Peppy the fucking Inspirational Cat you guys!

unapproachableblackchicks:


On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls
JULY 7, 2014BYCIARA MYERS, EDITOR 1 COMMENT
By Riki WilchinsTrueChildhttp://www.truechild.org
Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.
Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.
For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.
Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).
Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.
As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”
Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.
We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.
First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.
Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.
Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.
The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.




Download the report here

unapproachableblackchicks:

On Gender Norms and Young Black Girls


By Riki Wilchins
TrueChild
http://www.truechild.org

Riki Wilchins is the Executive Director at TrueChild, an organization that aids donors, policy-makers and practitioners in reconnecting race, class and gender through “gender transformative” approaches challenging rigid gender norms and inequities. Wilchins has authored three books on gender theory and has appeared in a number of anthologies and publications on the subject. Her work has led her to be profiled by The New York Times, and she was once selected as one of Time Magazine’s “100 Civic Innovators for the 21st Century.” Here, Wilchins discusses what we can do to correct the effects of gender norms on young, black girls.


Decades of researchhas found that challenging harmful gender norms are a key to improving life outcomes for at-risk communities.

For instance, young women who internalize narrow feminine ideals that prioritize motherhood, dependence, vulnerability and appearance have lower life outcomes in reproductive health, education and economic empowerment.

Major international donor agencies like PEPFAR, USAID, UNAIDs, and WHO have all implemented “gender transformative” initiatives that challenge traditional gender norms, and found them effective (an introductory paper is here).

Gender impacts every issue funders address; yet donors and grantees are seldom challenged to do innovative work around gender.

As a senior program officer put it, “My staff and grantees get race and class, but where’s the gender analysis? What I want to know is—what happened to gender?”

Part of the answer to her question may lie in new report onyoung Black girlswe conducted for the Heinz Endowments.

We found that Black adolescent girls and young women face special barriers related to both race and gender which have immense effects on their health, achievement and life outcomes. And this was especially true for low-income Black girls, who also have challenges associated with poverty.

First, Black girls’ unique race and gendered experiences of discrimination result in multiple stresses that – over time – impair their immune systems.

Also, they must navigate social hostilities based on race as well as pressures to conform to traditional feminine ideals and those specific to Black communities.

Moreover, feminine norms in the Black community often prioritize caretaking and self-sacrifice. Black girls may be silently encouraged to focus on others’ health while ignoring signals of pain and illness until their own bodies are in crisis.

The additive impact of these stresses can produce a “weathering effect,” in which Black women’s bodies become physically and biologically vulnerable, resulting in high rates of chronic disorders, reproductive health problems, infant mortality and obesity.

Download the report here

My Tumblr blog= lots of reblogs from other journals I enjoy with thoughts and observations from my own life salt-n-peppered in. I encourage you to check out (and follow) the original poster credited and source material.
Expect discussion of white privilege. Expect black feminism. Expect queer pride. Expect recipes, fashion, history, science, and art. This blog is what saves my sanity out here in Southeast Tennessee.

twitter.com/DecafRabbit

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